brics

The mega-success in China of Amir Khan’s blockbuster, Dangal, has echoed strongly at the second BRICS festival, where filmmakers and actors brainstormed ways to collaborate in cinema to anchor the soft-power of the five nation grouping.

Fans with Vuvuzelas

A new article explores how South Africa’s soft power is undermined by domestic issues such as racial tension and poverty.

China is a powerful international actor as the most populous country, the second largest economy, and a significant investor in modernizing its military. With early signs that the United States will emphasize hard power under the Trump administration, China has positioned itself as a champion of globalization and economic integration, perhaps signaling a desire to take on a greater international leadership role. It is doing this by doubling down on soft power, a measure of a country’s international attractiveness and its ability to influence other countries and publics. 

The Photo BRICS contest aims to facilitate international cultural dialogue between BRICS countries through photography and other visual aids. This year’s contest witnessed submission of more than 1,000 photos by youths from Brazil, India, Russia, China and South Africa. The 10 best photos (48 works in total), capturing nature and architecture of the BRICS countries and symbolizing the countries’ values won awards.
 

In this scenario, India has to gradually induce China into accepting the fact that not taking action against Pakistan-based terrorism is detrimental for everyone in the neighbourhood. And this can be achieved through greater dialogue and boosting bilateral economic cooperation to an extent that will dwarf the China-Pakistan economic relationship. 

How are the BRICS nations changing the practice and players in international development? 

[I]nvesting is now global – and policy decisions made by individual nations have significant consequences. As government leaders seek to attract capital, they need to think about themselves in a new way: as brands. [...] Countries can no longer afford to operate in isolation, unconcerned with establishing and growing international business relations. 

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